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Ramat Rachel's Orchards

 

Adjacent to the Kibbutz

 

Following Israel's War of Independence, Kibbutz Ramat Rachel was given the surrounding demilitarized area, along the Jordanian border, for agricultural development. The kibbutz members planted a variety of deciduous trees and vines—apple, peach, plum, and table grapes. Later, they planted sweet cherry trees, which took to the soil quite successfully. Jerusalem's cold winters and hot, dry spells in spring are ideal for growing the sweet and succulent cherries. Today, most of this land is covered with cherry trees, and the high-quality fruit, which has earned proud distinction for the kibbutz, is sold in Israel and abroad.

 

With the foreign market in mind, Ramat Rachel has recently planted organic cherry orchards, and recently completed construction of an innovative, state-of-the-art packing house for the harvested fruit.

 

At Kzaza, Adjacent to Kibbutz Revadim

 

In the 1950s, the "Jerusalem Corridor" communities were given land for agricultural development on the Judean coastal plain, given the shortage of available land for farming in the Jerusalem hills. Ramat Rachel received land close to Kibbutz Revadim and set about planting field crops.

 

When Mekorot re-routed its water lines in the 1970s, the area became suitable for crops requiring irrigation, most notably cotton. In the 1990s, cotton and other field crops became far less profitable, and Ramat Rachel decided to turn its coastal region fields into orchards. Today, the kibbutz actively farms a large area that yields high-quality persimmons, figs, and nectarines.

 

Most of the produce is exported, mainly to Europe (England, France, and Germany) but also to Russian and the Far East (Japan and Singapore) and the U.S.


Ramat Rachel's cherry orchards, adjacent to the kibbutz

picking season

Ramat Rachel's agriculture area near Kibbutz Revadim

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